iLoveBenefits: Industry News Blog

Asthma Costs the U.S. Economy $81.9 Billion Annually

January 22, 2018

 

 

The American Thoracic Society recently published research on the financial burden of Asthma in the U.S. Here are some key findings from the report:

 

Asthma costs the U.S. economy $81.9 billion annually.
About 15.4 million people in the U.S. had treated asthma each year.
The annual per-person medical cost of asthma was $3,266.
The cost of asthma prescriptions is $1,830 per person per year.
Asthma-related mortality cost $29 billion per year, representing 3,168 deaths.
Missed work and school days combined cost $3 billion per year.

 

 

Source: American Thoracic Society, January 12, 2018

January 22, 2018 | Categories: Chronic conditions,Cost,drugs,healthcare | Tags: , , | Comments (0)

Recent data about the US population from the CDC

  • POPULATION: The U.S. population grew from 216.0 million to 321.4 million between 1975 and 2015.
    • The number of Americans aged 65 and over increased from 22.6 million to 47.8 million during 1975–2015.
    • In 1980, 20.1% of the population identified as racial or ethnic minorities; by 2015, 38.4% of the population identified as racial or ethnic minorities.
    • During 1975–2015, children under 18 were more likely to live in poverty than adults aged 18-64, and adults 65 and over.
    • The rural (nonmetropolitan) share of the population declined between 1970 and 2015, while the suburban share of the population increased.
  • LIFE EXPECTANCY: Between 1975 and 2015, life expectancy increased by 6.2 years for the total population and increased for males and females.
  • INFANT MORTALITY: The infant mortality rate decreased 63%, from 16.07 to 5.90 deaths per 1,000 live births between 1975 and 2015.
  • CAUSES OF DEATH: Heart disease and cancer were the top two causes of death in the U.S. throughout the past 4 decades.
  • CIGARETTE SMOKING: Between 1974 and 2015, the age-adjusted prevalence of current cigarette smoking among persons aged 25 and over decreased from 36.9% to 15.6%. In 2015, men and women aged 25 and over with no high school diploma were more than four times as likely to smoke as those with a bachelor’s degree or higher.
  • OBESITY: The age-adjusted percentage of adults aged 20 and over with obesity increased steadily from 22.9% in 1988–1994 to 37.8% in 2013–2014.
  • PRESCRIPTION DRUGS: For all adult age groups, the percentage taking one or more prescription drug in the past month increased between 1988–1994 and 2013–2014. Among adults aged 65 and over, use of five or more prescription drugs in the past 30 days increased from 13.8% to 42.2% in same time period.
  • HEALTH INSURANCE: Between 1978 and September 2016 (preliminary data), the percentage of children under age 18 who were uninsured decreased from 12.0% to 5.0%; the percentage with Medicaid coverage increased from 11.3% to 39.2%; and the percentage with private coverage decreased from 75.1% to 53.5%.

Health, United States 2016” with “Chartbook on Long-term Trends in Health” is available on the NCHS web site at: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/hus.htm.

Should wellness programs be sponsored by your employer

According to a recent survey, only 48% of employees had participated in an employer-sponsored program to help them improve their physical health. Source: “Employees Report High Satisfaction with Health and Well-being Programs, but More Personalization is Needed,” National Business Group on Health Press Release, July 20, 2016, https://www.businessgrouphealth.org/pressroom/pressRelease.cfm?ID=280

90% of Strokes are Preventable

The Lancet recently published a study on the modifiable risk factors behind strokes. Here are some key findings from the report:

  • 10 controllable risk factors account for 90% of all strokes.
  • Eliminating high blood pressure was estimated to reduce risk by 48%.
  • High blood pressure causes 39% of strokes in North America, Australia and western Europe.
  • 60% of strokes in Southeast Asia are caused by high blood pressure.
  • Eliminating physical inactivity was estimated to reduce stroke risk by 36%.
  • Stroke risk is reduced by an estimated 23% when a poor diet is improved.

Source: The Lancet, July 15, 2016

Hospital at Home model gains steam

Hospital at Home model gains steam as Mt. Sinai program cuts costs, readmissions

Monday, June 6, 2016 | By Zack Budryk

Cutting readmissions and reducing medical errors, the nation’s third-leading cause of death, are among the healthcare industry’s top priorities, and the secret to solving both may be stepping up home care, according to Oregon Public Broadcasting.

Nearly two years ago, New York’s Mt. Sinai Hospital premiered the Mobile Acute Care Team (MACT) program. This pilot program aims to deliver hospital-quality home care for patients who are at high risk for readmission. So far, the ongoing pilot has cut costs by nearly 20 percent, according to the article, while also reducing an unspecified percentage of readmissions and delivering high patient satisfaction.

Under the program, Mt. Sinai partners with community institutions such as Visiting Nurse Service of New York to provide home treatment for such conditions as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), congestive heart failure, diabetes and urinary tract infections, according to a blog post from the hospital. “This is a real paradigm shift in medicine,” Mt. Sinai’s Linda DeCherrie, M.D., told OPB.  People will often say on first glance, ‘That sounds so great that we should definitely do that,’ but when you really get into it, it’s a totally different way of providing care.”

Medicare’s refusal to cover hospital-at-home services has kept many such programs from getting off the ground, but the Center for Medicaid & Medicaid Services’ Innovation Center awarded the MACT project $9.6 million in 2014 as part of its second round of Health Care Innovation Awards.

Nor is the MACT program the only example of such a program working; an internal analysis of the Humana At Home care management service found it cut hospitalizations among participants 45 percent while boosting survival rates, according toOpen Minds. Those Hospital at Home programs that have demonstrated consistent success have been connected to primary- and palliative care programs as well as disease-management programsFierceHealthcare previously reported.

To learn more: – read the OPB article – here’s the Mt. Sinai blog post – read the CMS announcement – check out the Open Minds post

Related Articles: How to make Hospital at Home programs work How transitional care cuts readmission risk First Medicare-approved transitional care center opens for business Readmission reduction solution: House calls How hospital-community partnerships can boost population health ER overcrowding solution: Community paramedicine

Medicaid programs educating beneficiaries

A new AHIP Issue Brief provides background information about the Medicaid program and explains how health plans work with the states to deliver care for Medicaid beneficiaries.

Our issue brief provides an overview of the federal-state Medicaid partnership, who is covered by Medicaid and the benefits they receive, the role of Medicaid health plans, research findings on the value offered by Medicaid health plans, and the key issues health plans face under the Medicaid “mega reg” that CMS is expected to finalize at some point this spring.

The brief also highlights key areas where Medicaid health plans are demonstrating strong leadership:

  • By offering integrated health care delivery systems, Medicaid health plans promote access to coordinated, quality care and prevent overutilization of services that are both unnecessarily costly and potentially harmful for their enrollees, including dual eligibles.
  • By conducting outreach and health education efforts that encourage Medicaid beneficiaries to receive needed preventive care, Medicaid health plans help to reduce unnecessary hospital admissions.

By helping to manage chronic conditions through patient-centric disease management programs, Medicaid health plans are improving health outcomes while also reducing the costs of providing health care to beneficiaries with complex health care needs.

4 in 5 expect that by 2021, patients will compare ratings before choosing a hospital

Survey: Most Patients Will Belong to Incentivized Health Plans by 2021

The Society for Healthcare Strategy & Market Development recently conducted a survey on healthcare leaders’ thoughts on emerging trends in healthcare. Here are some key findings from the report:

  • 99% agreed that by 2021 patients will demand a greater role in treatment planning.
  • 4 in 5 expect that by 2021, patients will compare ratings before choosing a hospital.
  • 89% said that most of their hospital’s insured patients will belong to incentivized health plans by 2021.
  • Most practitioners (88%) predict that at least a quarter of chronic disease patients will receive it remotely.
  • Two-thirds of practitioners predict that most chronic illness patients will receive primary care that includes some type of psychotherapy service.

Source: Society for Healthcare Strategy & Market Development, January 26, 2016

30% don’t trust their employers to be involved in their health and well-being

According to a recent survey:

  • Just half of employees participated in a wellness activity or health management-related program in the last year
  • 71% of employees prefer to manage their own health
  • 32% said the wellness initiatives offered by their employers don’t meet their needs
  • 46% don’t want their employers to have access to their personal health information
  • 30% don’t trust their employers to be involved in their health and well-being

Source: “Primary Care physicians accepting Medicare: A Snapshot ,” The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, October 2015, http://files.kff.org/attachment/data-note-primary-care-physicians-accepting-medicare-a-snapshot

How many times did you go to the doctor last year?

According to a recently released government data brief, in 2012:

  • There were an estimated 929 million physician office visits, or 301 physician office visits per 100 persons
  •  Females (342 visits per 100 females) had more office visits overall than males (258 visits per 100 males)
  • The visit rate for adults aged 65 and over was 592 visits per 100 adults
  •  The visit rate for adults aged 18–64 was 264 visits per 100 adults
  • The visit rate for children under age 18 was 232 visits per 100 children

Source: “Variation in Physician Office Visit Rates by Patient Characteristics and State, 2012,”NCHS Data Brief Number 212, Centers for Disease Prevention and Control, September 2015, http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/databriefs/db212.htm#findings

AHRQ Stats: Statin Use

 

The number of adults who reported using prescribed statins more than doubled in 10 years, from 17.6 million in 2000–2001 to 40.8 million in 2010–2011. (Source: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Medical Expenditure Panel Survey Statistical Brief #458: Trends in Statin Therapy among Adults (Age ≥ 18), United States, 2000 to 2011.)

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