iLoveBenefits: Industry News Blog

Emergency Doctor’s Perspectives on Getting and Paying for the Care of their Patients

As you look at this survey keep in mind who they are asking and how they are responding. For example, 8 out of 10 are seeing patients…who are foregoing or delaying medical care. While it seems to say that 80% of physicians are seeing at least one patient who is delaying health care, it is not providing the detail about how many patients on the whole are delaying medical care…

And what percent of patients understand their health insurance coverage and how it works?

According to a recent nation-wide survey of emergency physicians:

  • 96% said that emergency patients do not understand what their health insurance policies cover for emergency care
  • 8 in 10 are seeing patients with health insurance who have forgone or delayed medical care because of high costs
  • 62% say most health insurance companies provide less than adequate coverage for emergency care visits
  • Over 60% have had trouble finding in-network specialists to care for patients in the last year
  • A quarter of them say they have trouble finding in-network specialists on a daily basis

Source: “Insurance Companies Mislead Patients By Selling “Affordable” Policies That Cover Very Little,” American College of Emergency Physicians News Release, May 9, 2016, http://newsroom.acep.org/2016-05-09-Insurance-Companies-Mislead-Patients-By-Selling-Affordable-Policies-That-Cover-Very-Little

50% of hospital admissions occur through the ED

EDs account for half of hospital admissions

A report from RAND Corp. found that hospital emergency departments
accounted for about half of admissions in the U.S. Aside from conducting
diagnostic tests that cannot be done in doctor’s offices, EDs have supplemented
the work of primary care providers by managing overflow, after-hours cases and
weekend demand for health care, researchers said. “We believe there needs
to be more effort to integrate the operations of emergency departments into
both inpatient and outpatient care systems,” RAND researcher Kristy
Gonzalez Morganti said. Nurse.com (6/13)