iLoveBenefits: Industry News Blog

What are the long term implications to longevity

AHRQ Stats: Hospital Mortality Rates

 

Hospital mortality rates among adults declined from 2002 to 2012 for four common health conditions, decreasing by 45 percent for pneumonia, 41 percent for heart attack, 29 percent for congestive heart failure and 27 percent for stroke. (Source: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Statistical Brief #194: Trends in Observed Adult Inpatient Mortality for High-Volume Conditions, 2002-2012.)

Hospital Acquired Conditions – Concerted, Coordinated Efforts Across Health Care Stakeholders Make a Difference

HHS: Hospital-acquired conditions, inpatient mortality are down The incidence of hospital-acquired conditions fell 17% from 2010 to 2013, while inpatient deaths dropped by close to 35,000 in 2013, according to an HHS report. The reduction was attributed in part to health IT tools designed to improve quality. Healthcare Informatics online

How American Die

A very interesting article by Bloomberg:

http://www.bloomberg.com/dataview/2014-04-17/how-americans-die.html#b04g22t20w14

We are making progress in the fight against cancer and heart disease

CDC: U.S. mortality rates dropped slightly in 2011
The mortality rates for five out of the 15 main causes of death in the U.S. fell significantly from 2010 to 2011 and rates overall dipped slightly last year, but the average life expectancy remained at 78.7 years, according to a new CDC report. The rate of deaths from heart disease and cancer, which make up 47% of all U.S. deaths, dropped by 3% and 2.4%, respectively. The mortality rates declined for men and women. WebMD (10/10)

Leading causes of death by age group

Percent Distribution of Five Leading Causes of Death
by age group: United States

Age

Unintentional Injuries

Homicide

Suicide

Cancer

Heart Disease

All Other Causes

1-24 Years

38%

13%

12%

7%

3%

25%

Unintentional Injuries

Cancer

Heart Disease

Suicide

Homicide

All Other Causes

25-44 Years

25%

14%

12%

11%

6%

32%

Cancer

Heart Disease

Unintentional Injuries

Chronic Lower Respiratory Diseases

Chronic Liver Disease and Cirrhosis

All Other Causes

45-64 Years

32%

21%

7%

4%

4%

32%

Heart Disease

Cancer

Chronic Lower Respiratory Diseases

Stroke

Alzheimer’s Disease

All Other Causes

65+ Years

27%

22%

7%

6%

5%

34%

Source: NCHS Data Brief, Number 99, July 2012, CDC/National Center for Health Statistics
http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/databriefs/db99.htm

Health indicators for adolescents on the rise

Findings From the ‘America’s Children in Brief: Key National Indicators of Well-Being, 2012’ Report

A drop in births to adolescents, from 20 per 1,000 girls ages   15 to 17 (2009) to 17 per 1,000 (2010, preliminary data)
A drop in the proportion of infants born before 37 weeks’   gestation (preterm), from 12.2 percent (2009) to 12.0 percent (2010,   preliminary data)
A drop in deaths before the first birthday, from 6.4 per 1,000   births (2009) to 6.1 per 1,000 births (2010, preliminary data)
An increase in vaccination coverage with one dose or more of   the meningococcal conjugate vaccine for adolescents ages 13-17, from 12   percent (2006) to 63 percent (2010)
A drop in the percentage of children, birth to 6 years of age,   living in a home where someone smoked regularly, from 8.4 percent (2005) to   6.1 percent (2010)
A rise in the percentage of children from birth to 17 years of   age living in counties in which levels of one or more air pollutants were   above allowable levels, from 59 percent (2009) to 67 percent (2010)

Source: Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics
http://childstats.gov/americaschildren/press_release.asp

Once again, it is all about education

CDC report connects health to education, income
Highly educated people with more income were less likely to have chronic diseases and had greater life expectancy than those with less income and education, according to a report released by the CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics. From 2007 to 2010, obesity rates were lower among children and teens ages 2 to 19 in homes where the head of the household had at least a bachelor’s degree. Women age 25 and older with a bachelor’s degree or higher were less likely to be obese, but the obesity rate did not correlate consistently with education among men. Time.com/Healthland blog (5/16), United Press International (5/16)

A few facts about mortality

Cancer Incidence and Death Rates* by Site, Race, and Ethnicity†, US, 2004-2008
American Cancer Society, Surveillance Research, 2012

Home births rise despite higher neonatal mortality rate
American Medical News, February 13, 2012

Deaths: Preliminary Data for 2010
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Vital Statistics Reports, Volume 60 Number 4, January 11, 2012

March 15, 2012 | Categories: Chronic conditions,healthcare | Tags: , , | Comments (0)

Use of telemedicine reduced ICU mortality by 20 percent

The use of telemedicine reduced ICU mortality by 20% and shortened the average length of stay in the ICU by a mean difference of 1.26 days, but didn’t reduce in-hospital mortality or overall length of stay, according to a recent analysis of 13 previous studies.

Source: “Impact of Telemedicine Intensive Care Unit Coverage on Patient Outcomes: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis,” Archives of Internal Medicine, Vol. 171 No. 6, March 28, 2011, http://archinte.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/short/171/6/498

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